Professional Resource

2016 Pre-Conference Forums

May 17, 2016

Formerly known as Pre-Institutes, these comprehensive, full-day sessions* allow you to take a deep dive into a specific topic relevant to your interests and professional needs.

Arrive early for a deep dive into a specific topic relevant to your interests and professional needs. Formerly known as Pre-Institutes, these popular, full-day sessions* offer comprehensive information you can’t get anywhere else. Explore the sessions below. Forum selections will begin in September.




Parent-Child Interventions and Treatments That Work

Event Details:

To be most effective in intervening with young children and parents, it is important that both clinical and early care and education professionals learn about a continuum of “interventions that work” to support young children and families. In order to accomplish this objective, this forum will describe evidence-based and informed parent-child interventions, Child-Parent Psychotherapy, Circle of Security Parenting, and Consultation to Child Care. Audience participation and discussion will be included in the session.

Presenters:

Neil Boris, PhD, Florida State University
Chandra Ghosh Ippen, PhD, University of California, San Francisco
Kadija Johnston, PhD, University of California, San Francisco


DC: 0-5™ - An Introduction to the Diagnostic Classification of Mental Health and Developmental Disorders of Infancy and Early Childhood Birth to 5

Event Details:

The DC:0-3R Revision Task Force spent the last 3 years revising and updating this classification system. DC:0-5™ expands the age range, maintains a multiaxial approach, introduces new disorders, and excludes others. This session provides an overview of major changes, opportunities to interact with the authors, and information about DC:0-5 Training. The session is intended for individuals who are familiar with DC:0-3R. Each registered participant will have the opportunity to pre-order a copy of DC:0-5 for pick up at this forum.

Presenters:

Alice S. Carter, PhD, University of Maryland, Baltimore
Julie Cohen, ZERO TO THREE
Helen Egger, PhD, Duke University
Mary Margaret Gleason, MD, Tulane University
Miri Keren, PhD, Haruv Institute
Alicia Lieberman, PhD, University of California, San Francisco
Kathleen Mulrooney, ZERO TO THREE
Cindy Oser, ZERO TO THREE
Charles Zeanah, MD, Tulane University



Innovations in Primary Care: Relational, Developmental, and Sustainable Approaches to Children and Families

Event Details:

This forum brings together pediatric primary care clinicians and early developmental thought leaders to explore innovative primary care models, screening and relational techniques to support the family system. Participants will understand the science behind and navigate the complexities of implementing trauma informed care, screening beyond the child, relational medicine, and care coordination. The day will also provide practical tips on available tools, resources, clinic-based interventions, implementation strategies and upcoming payment models. The forum is designed to be interactive with time allotted for discussion following speakers.

Presenters:

Jonathan Goldfinger, MD, ZERO TO THREE
Mike Regalado, MD, University of California, Los Angeles
Alan Mendelsohn, MD, New York University School of Medicine
Marian Earls, MD, FAAP Community of Care of North Carolina, Raleigh, NC
Teri Pettersen, MD, The Children’s Clinic, Portland, OR
Linda Gilkerson, PhD, Erikson Institute, Chicago, IL
Sheila Walker, PhD, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD
Colleen Kraft, MD, FAAP Cincinnati’s Children Hospital, Cincinnati, OH
Hannah Rosenberg, MSc, Boston’s Children Hospital, Boston, MA



Little Boys, Later Life: What We Need to Know

Event Details:

This panel of speakers will address the developmental issues of infant boys from several perspectives—neurobiological, behavioral, and cultural. These presentations will be based on empirical research that indicates that boys and girls start life with different endowments or emotional tendencies based upon the influence of gender-specific innate and environmental factors. Research indicates that when caregiving is inadequate, boys are more likely to exhibit problematic internalizing and externalizing behaviors which set the stage for additional problems in preschool, in later school settings, and later in life. After presenting this growing body of research from their different perspectives, the panel members will consider implications for early childhood policy, especially as they impact boys.

Moderator:

Kandace Thomas, MPP, Irving Harris Foundation, Chicago, IL

Presenters:

Paul Golding, PhD, Sante Fe Boys Foundation
Mark McDaniel, PhD, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
Allan Schore, PhD, University of California, Los Angeles
Daniel Shaw, PhD, University of Pittsburgh
Joy Osofsky, PhD, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, New Orlens, LA



The Child Welfare Challenge: Meeting the Needs of Substance-Exposed Infants and Toddlers and Their Families

Event Details:

This session will address one of the major challenges facing the child welfare system—substance-exposed children and their families. Because alcohol and/or drug use is a major risk factor for child maltreatment, it is imperative that professionals in the infant-family field understand how to promote the well-being of affected infants and toddlers and their families. In this session, we will provide: (1) an overview of the experiences and outcomes of substance-exposed young children, (2) descriptions of programs designed to support substance-involved families and young children, and (3) recommendations for improving the child welfare service delivery system’s approach to this issue.

Presenters:

Mimi Graham EdD, Florida State University
Therese Grant, PhD, University of Washington School of Medicine
Brenda Jones Harden, PhD, University of Maryland, College Park
Janie Huddleston, MS, ZERO TO THREE, Little Rock, AR
Kathryn Shea, LCSW, The Florida Center for Early Childhood, Sarasota, FL
Nancy Suchman, PhD, Yale University, New Haven, CT



Integrating Mindfulness Practice Into Reflective Supervision/Leadership in Order to Support Program Quality

Event Details:

An exploration of ways mindfulness practice can be incorporated into reflective supervision and used to address issues such as: integration of mentoring and monitoring responsibilities, recognizing and addressing compassion fatigue, and helping staff increase reflective capacity. Includes a review of research supporting mindfulness practice with emphasis on its connection to the neuropsychology of self-regulatory processes. Will include consideration of the supervisor’s multiple roles and responsibilities within a blended clinical/administrative model and mindfulness practice tools and strategies to help increase supervisors’ effectiveness.

Presenters:

Sherryl Scott Heller, PhD, Tulane University
Trudi Norman Murch, PhD, Southwest Human Development
Debbie Reno Smith, LMFT, Victor Inc.


*Separate registration and $225 fee required. Annual Conference registration not required to attend Pre-Conference Forums.