Policy Resource

Bring the Message on Budget Threats Home! Join Tuesday’s Webinar and Call Congress!

Apr 8, 2011

Next week, the House of Representatives will vote on a 2012 Budget Resolution that, if adopted by both Houses of Congress, would radically alter the shape of government and threaten support for vulnerable infants, toddlers, older children and their families.

Next week, the House of Representatives will vote on a 2012 Budget Resolution that, if adopted by both Houses of Congress, would radically alter the shape of government and threaten support for vulnerable infants, toddlers, older children and their families.

State voices have never been so important. Advocates from all around the country are joining together to push for a more responsible approach to our nation’s budgetary problems that does not seek to reduce the deficit by depriving at-risk children of the means to fulfill their potential. On Tuesday, April 12th from 12:00 – 1:30 p.m. EST, the Coalition on Human Needs and the Children’s Leadership Council will co-sponsor a webinar to address the proposed Resolution’s effects on states, communities, and families. All next week, advocates in states will be participating in a national call-in campaign to urge their Representatives to reject a budget that threatens the future of our nation’s children.

The Resolution being voted on-Chairman Paul Ryan’s “The Path to Prosperity”-would cut $5.8 trillion over the next ten years and compromise programs on which the most vulnerable children and families rely. Medicaid and the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) would be converted into block grants, and many means-tested programs would be saddled with poorly formulated work requirements. Domestic discretionary spending – the bucket that funds programs like Early Head Start, WIC, and CCDBG – would be capped at 2008 levels for five years, preventing programs from responding to the unique needs of infants and toddlers and serving the growing population of vulnerable babies and families.

Organizations can only carry the message so far: Constituents have the most powerful voices with their representatives. Here is what you can do:

  • REGISTER for Tuesday’s webinar to learn what makes Ryan’s budget resolution a Path to Austerity for infants and toddlers, and find out how you can join the national effort to fight back! Join other advocates and professionals and learn how Ryan’s proposal would hurt America’s most vulnerable children and what we can do.
  • Call your Representative and urge him or her to vote NO! on the House Budget Resolution during the national call-in period between now and when the vote occurs some time next week. The number to use to reach the U.S. Capitol Switchboard toll-free is: 1-888-245-0215. If you can’t get through to the Capitol switchboard, click here to find the direct number to your Representative’s office (not toll-free).

Ask to be directed to your Representative’s office and deliver a message like this:

I am a constituent and I strongly urge you to vote NO on the House Budget Committee’s Budget Resolution. It would slash Medicaid, Medicare, food stamps, education… in fact, all the investments that help Americans to be economically secure and help our youngest children fulfill their potential. It denies vital help for low-income and middle class people while giving trillions of dollars in tax cuts to wealthy Americans and big corporations. Please reject these extreme proposals that would weaken federal protections in a recession and stall economic growth for us all.

Advocate for Babies

Update on 2011 Continuing Resolution: As of this posting, Congress had not reached agreement on legislation to keep the government running. If they do not do so by midnight tonight, the federal government would shut down except for essential services. Leaders in the House and the Senate reportedly are trying to find a way to agree on a short-term measure to keep the government operating for a few days while the final bill is crafted—assuming they can agree on its basic components.

Read more about: